Let’s Talk Hormones: Types

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By chemical nature hormones can be Lipid-derived (e.g. steroids), monoamines, peptides or proteins. Steroids such as testosterone and estrogen are usually responsible for physical development from puberty to maturity and also for the fertility cycles. They are produced by placenta, adrenal gland, and gonads.

Peptides and proteins are made from strings of amino acids that regulate different functions from sleep to sugar content and concentration.

Monoamines are made from amino acids such as tryptophan which is what makes one sleepy after eating turkey.

The various hormones work via several modes, endocrine, autocrine, and paracine. Endocrine hormones are secreted into the blood stream and have an effect at a distance from where it is released, for example, insulin regulation. Autocrine hormones act on the same cells from which they are secreted for example maturation of T-cells. Paracrine hormones act near the location they are released for example, blood clotting. Hormones regulate almost all of the biological functions and can act at extremely low concentrations – at parts per billion or trillion.

By chemical nature hormones can be Lipid-derived (e.g. steroids), monoamines, peptides or proteins. Steroids such as testosterone and estrogen are usually responsible for physical development from puberty to maturity and also for the fertility cycles. They are produced by placenta, adrenal gland, and gonads.

Peptides and proteins are made from strings of amino acids that regulate different functions from sleep to sugar content and concentration.

Monoamines are made from amino acids such as tryptophan which is what makes one sleepy after eating turkey.

The various hormones work via several modes, endocrine, autocrine, and paracine. Endocrine hormones are secreted into the blood stream and have an effect at a distance from where it is released, for example, insulin regulation. Autocrine hormones act on the same cells from which they are secreted for example maturation of T-cells. Paracrine hormones act near the location they are released for example, blood clotting. Hormones regulate almost all of the biological functions and can act at extremely low concentrations – at parts per billion or trillion.

With such a large variety of hormone types and modes-of-action it is no wonder that it can be very difficult to identify those that are important for specific symptoms and diseases.

With such a large variety of hormone types and modes-of-action it is no wonder that it can be very difficult to identify those that are important for specific symptoms and diseases.

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