Pelvic Pain and Abdominal Heat – A Personal Story

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In the past year I have had two strange, but fairly minor in the grand scheme of things, health issues. When I was going through them, I tried to find information about both conditions online but wasn’t able to find much information or advice about what to do to cure them. Because there seems to be a dearth of online information about these issues, I decided to write this post.

Though I glanced around on the internet for information about these conditions, I did not do extensive research into either of them, and this post should not be seen as professional, or medical, advice. It is simply a description of my experience and what seemed to help me. I hope that the things that helped me can help others who are going through similar things.

Issue #1 – Pelvic Pain

On my web site, I described the pain as follows:

I’ve been experiencing pelvic (toward the back door) pain for a while. It started a few months ago but it was on and off and I was able to ignore it. A few weeks ago it got so bad that it kept me up all night for a few nights. Then, a week ago, it became constant. Constant, horrible, tightness and spasming in my pelvis. It’s excruciating. Truly, it’s the most horrible pain I’ve ever experienced. On a 1 to 10 pain scale, I’ll give the pain a 9. I’ve never felt pain this horrible, but I’ve never passed a kidney stone or gotten severely burned, so I’ll reserve a 10 for those things. It’s consuming pain though and it really, really, really sucks.”

Basically, I had a horrible muscle spasm and/or cramp in my pelvis that really, really hurt.

I think that it was a stress reaction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Some people get stress headaches, apparently I get stress pelvis-aches. Neither are a choice by any means, but stress-reducing activities can help to relieve symptoms of both. Stress reduction and vagal nerve toning exercises can also help to alleviate autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms.

The things that I did that helped are:

  1. Chiropractic adjustments 2x per week
  2. Kava tea (it’s not for long-term use and I only used it as needed, but it helped a lot)
  3. Meditation
  4. Sitting on a tennis ball (maybe it massaged the region?)
  5. Massage
  6. The book, “A Headache in the Pelvis: A New Understanding and Treatment for Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes” has excellent advice in it, and it also helped me to realize that I’m not alone and that the pain was not going to last forever.
  7. Hot baths with Epsom salt
  8. Kratom, Corydalis and other herbal painkillers
  9. Going on a vacation

Through doing those things I was able to stop the cycle of pain, tension, anxiety, and muscle-spasm. I have been pain-free for about a year.

I went to a doctor when the pain started and was offered an anti-psychotic drug as treatment. I’m not sure what she thought an anti-psychotic drug would do for a muscle spasm, but I refused the prescription. The ridiculous over-use of anti-psychotic drugs to “treat” every condition imaginable is a topic for another post, but here’s an example of it happening to me.

Issue #2 – Heat in Abdomen

Months after I recovered from the pelvic pain, I was waking up in the middle of the night, typically around 3 am, with a burning-hot feeling in my abdomen. It felt as if I had swallowed a hot coal, and the heat made it impossible to sleep. The heat would remain for a few hours, then it would dissipate and I would be able to sleep again.

Though what I ate did make a bit of difference, I don’t think it was indigestion. The heat was in my abdomen, but it didn’t really feel like it was in my stomach. These things are hard to pinpoint though.

It wasn’t hot-flashes from menopause. I’m 36 and menstruate on a regular schedule.

I didn’t sweat – it was a dry heat.

My night heat experience was strange and somewhat disconcerting, but I doubt that it’s indicative of anything seriously wrong with me. The worst thing about it is that it kept me from sleeping through the night. Though I didn’t/don’t think that my nighttime abdominal heat is a serious problem, it was annoying and I wanted it to go away. I changed a couple of things in my life, and, as of now, it has stopped. The things that I think helped are:

  1. A blend of herbs called Adrenoplex
  2. Acupuncture
  3. Eating less meat and more fruit

Because the Adrenoplex herbal formula helped, and because of things my acupuncturist said, I suspect that my abdominal heat issue was a result of adrenal fatigue. I am trying to keep my stress levels low to keep my adrenals healthy.

I haven’t been woken by abdominal heat in more than a month. I’m hoping that I won’t experience it in the future either.

Time

As with all stories of individual healing, one cannot control for the element of time. I have no doubt that time, and my body’s natural healing mechanisms, helped me through both the pelvic pain and the abdominal heat. I think that the other things I mentioned helped too, and I hope that they help others as well.

Hope

Even though these issues weren’t (as far as I know) indicative of serious problems, they were still disconcerting and I wanted answers about how to get through them. Not being able to find answers online fed into anxiety, and may have even made both issues worse. I hope that in sharing my experiences, and in noting not only what helped me but also that I got through them and am no longer experiencing either pelvic pain or abdominal heat, others can rest a bit easier and know that they can get through these odd issues as well.

Information about Fluoroquinolone Toxicity

Information about the author, and adverse reactions to fluoroquinolone antibiotics (Cipro/ciprofloxacin, Levaquin/levofloxacin, Avelox/moxifloxacin and Floxin/ofloxacin) can be found on Lisa Bloomquist’s site,www.floxiehope.com.

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